Author Salon Reviews, New York Pitch, Algonkian Writer Conferences, Poetry

Poets, Writers, Author Salon Reviews, New York Pitch Conference, Algonkian Writer Conferences
It is currently 25 Apr 2017, 00:54

All times are UTC + 3 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: 19 Dec 2012, 02:50 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: 10 Apr 2005, 04:13
Posts: 38
Please use this forum to complete your review or commentary concerning the New York Pitch Conference. Simply log in and click on "post reply" link.

For review purposes, we are most concerned with what you took away from the event in the way of knowledge and savvy concerning your novel and the market.

Also, below are a series of articles and studies from Author Salon that will enable you to successfully make your project more competitive. More of these are in formulation and will be added to the mix on Author Salon in early 2013.

Regards,
Michael, Susan and Paula


________________________________________________________

AUTHOR SALON REVIEWS CRAFT POINTS AND EPIPHANY
Lessons and Readings Necessary To The Creation of a Competitive Commercial Manuscript

By Michael Neff

If you're working on a commercial fiction or narrative non-fiction manuscript, you will benefit if you view your project as possessing three layers of increasing complexity:

Layer I: Overall story premise and plot. These involve top level decisions regarding major characters, the overall setting, plot line evolution, dramatic complications, theme, reversals, and other, as defined in the Six Act Two-Goal Novel guide (see below).

Layer II: Story scenes and their structural nature, as well as inter-scene narrative. Consider your story generally composed of units of scene, each scene performing specific tasks in the novel, always moving the plot line(s) forward and evolving the character(s). Each scene contains an opening set, an evolution of middle, and conclusion. But whether scene-based, or inter-scene, this layer comprises the matter and techniques that clarify, evolve, and elaborate on the matters of Layer I.

Layer III: The narrative composition and delivery of your scenes and inter-scene text. This includes proper point of view(s), overall tone, the quality of the narrative prose in terms of sentences, cinema, emotion display, metaphor, and more.

For our purposes here, we will divide the group of craft articles below into the three categories above.

NOTE: there is some overlap between layers and thus the need to repeat certain craft points or specific articles more than once. Author Salon writer members engage in reviews of the following array of craft technique and apply to their project as appropriate and necessary. Author Salon editors and writer peers utilize these craft points as reference in the course of critique and discussion.

The following articles and guides were written by Michael Neff, Barbara Kyle, Chris Stewart, and Caitlin Alexander.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

LAYER I CRAFT POINTS

Whether Film Script or Fiction MS, Coverage Counts
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/96/

The Six Act Two-Goal Novel (premise, reversals, complications, major points)
http://www.authorsalon.com/page/general/sixact/

The Plot, Setting and Conflict Outline Guide (for breaking plot into acts and briefs)
http://authorconnect.authorsalon.com/up ... Oguide.pdf

The Novel Setting : Maximizing Opportunities For Verve and Uniqueness
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/97/

A Clever Dose of Antagonistic Force (crafting the proper antagonist makes the novel)
http://www.authorsalon.com/page/general ... iterature/

Caitlin’s Guide to Precise Comparables (best article ever written on this crucial issue)
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/62/

Crossing the Epiphany Line (what every serious writer must accomplish)
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/58/


LAYER II CRAFT POINTS

Whether Film Script or Fiction MS, Coverage Counts
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/96/

Storyboard Considerations for Producing Effective Scenes
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/104/

Energy in Opposition: The Forces Within Strong Scenes
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/103/

Sympathy Factors in The Hook
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/75/

Protagonist First Impressions
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/63/

The Artful Manner of Delivering Exposition
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/76/

Restoring the Troll Trope (beware overuse of tropes - applies to all genres)
http://www.authorsalon.com/page/general/fantasytropes/


LAYER III CRAFT POINTS

Whether Film Script or Fiction MS, Coverage Counts
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/96/

Narrative : From Passive Voice to Eudora and Ray (all AS writers must achieve Level 3)
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/95/

"To Be" or Not? Too Much "Was" Will Hurt Your MS
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/80/

The Ultimate Narrative Block Buster: The PDQ (narrative think-tanking)
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/78/

Greek Out Your Sentence Structure
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/42/

Prose Drills For Developing Style and Voice (writing exercises to hone style)
http://www.authorsalon.com/craft/view/48/


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 20 Dec 2012, 20:30 
Offline

Joined: 08 Dec 2012, 01:53
Posts: 1
Hi, Michael, Paula and Susan:

To put it simply, the conference totally exceeded my expectations. I still can't believe how much I learned in such a short period of time about how to make my project viable and marketable. For the first time, I understand what high concept means, and what it takes to pitch with success. I certainly didn't perfect the art -- far from it! -- but at least now I'm not completely in the weeds. To walk away with that would have been enough. But then to have the opportunity to interact with editors with, in my case, Michael's incredible support? Talk about validation. I feel like I leapfrogged over the years I would have spent in time-consuming, poorly constructed queries to agents who, understandably, would never have given me the time of day. Now I feel like I have a chance, especially because I will be able to receive continuing guidance through Author Salon.

Although I didn't have the chance to work with all of you, I have to assume you all have the passion Michael has for helping fledging writers like me. I want to thank you for an enormously rewarding experience and for your dedication to the debut novelist.

Warm regards and best wishes for the holidays,
Barbara Hoyt


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 20 Dec 2012, 22:03 
Offline

Joined: 12 Dec 2012, 05:28
Posts: 1
The Algonkian pitch conference is the most comprehensive conference focused on how to get a novel published in the current market that I've ever attended. Here are some of its most valuable parts:

1. Ability to pitch real acquisition editors (four of them!) and refine your pitch. This alone is unbelievably useful.
2. The interaction with like-minded peers - seeing what other projects people are working on. Also, this is the best way to form a writing group and help each other moving forward.
3. An insiders view into the publishing world, where it is today, and where its going.

Note: this conference does not focus on craft (nor should it). It helps writers get their work in front of agents and editors, not help you write the next Pulitzer prize winning novel.

Thank you Michael and Paula for a wonderful and unforgettable experience!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 22 Dec 2012, 05:47 
Offline

Joined: 03 Dec 2012, 07:05
Posts: 1
The conference was an amazing experience for me. I don't think I would have been able to find a better one that teaches about the market, how to pitch effectively, and then gives me the experience of a lifetime in pitching my novel to editors from renowned publishing houses.
The group leaders are extremely helpful, sincerely wanting to take your ideas to the next level. They always make themselves available for questions.
As for the group, you meet such amazing, aspiring authors all willing to help one another. The networking is great and invaluable.
I am incredibly thankful for attending. When I got home I applied what I learnt and can see improvements with my novel already. I am excited to see what comes next.

Thank you Michael, Paula, and Susan! You rock!

:) H.D


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 22 Dec 2012, 07:46 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 03 Dec 2012, 03:55
Posts: 1
There are several brands of writers conferences, each ideal for authors in a different stage of their career. If you're just barely starting out, if you don't know why 'less is more' is important, for example, then NY Pitch isn't the conference for you. On the other hand, if you've been working hard, and you've finished a manuscript, but are in the process of beating yourself senseless against the brick wall of the publishing world; if you have a folder full of rejections, and a heart that's devoid of hope, sign up. Now.

The conference is driven by one and only one thing: pragmatism. The worst thing you can do for a struggling author is to tell them that everything is alright, that their work is marvelous, and to 'just be patient'. NYPitch is about tough love. The brutal truth is that becoming a successful author is only peripherally about your craft, or even your artistic vision. Authors are, first and foremost, the creators of a product that must be sold. NYPitch is all about teaching us what will sell. You may not like this; it may shock and annoy you; but in order to survive, your book has to a) be high quality and b) be something the publishing world would like to publish. A lot of authors have part (a) down and fail utterly on part (b). NYPitch will teach you how to rule part (b).

As such, it stands alone. I have been to literally dozens of conferences. None, not a single one, provide either the direct access or the honest, no-frills truth about what editors actually want to see. In my opinion, every hopeful writer should attend at least one NYPitch conference.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 26 Dec 2012, 18:32 
Offline

Joined: 03 Dec 2012, 03:32
Posts: 1
The NY Pitch conference was an exacting, informative and eye-opening experience. Michael helped me focus on the crux of my novel (for the pitch) and not get distracted by its trappings. The interactive sessions with my group and then the editors truly brought home the point that every stage of getting published had its own procedures and demands. Not enough to imagine a great concept alone-it must be executed well, pitched even better and polished to a brilliance to stand apart.
All in all, I came away with much more than I went in with.
Thank you, Michael, for your wonderful insights. They will always be applied.

-F.Kothari.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 31 Dec 2012, 19:28 
Offline

Joined: 03 Dec 2012, 02:54
Posts: 1
The pitch conference ethos to help the author, specifically to help market her/his wares, is everywhere evident. Facilitators, other authors, editors were all encouraging and helpful in practical, applied-side ways. Refreshingly different from dog-eat-dog, anxious, competitive environment that mars some other professional conferences I have experienced.

Top three takeaways:
--A better title. Susan listened to me, paused the conversation at “soldier’s heart” and said, “That’s a good title.” Of course! Thanks, Susan!
--Re-writing the pitch. Gollyosky I am still rewriting the blasted thing. Now I have the eyes to see how to do it.
--Advice to not rush the submission process until the mss and pitch are ready. I know this is good advice. It will be so hard to follow. But I will try.

OK I think my minute's up. Thanks again, Michael, Susan and Paula.

Michele McKnight Baker


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 03 Jan 2013, 20:12 
Offline

Joined: 04 Dec 2012, 21:38
Posts: 1
As someone who spent years going the typical query letter route, I found the Algonkian Pitch Conference to be a complete game changer for me. I already understood that it takes years to hone your craft and an exceptional amount of diligence if you actually want to make it in the world of publishing. What I did not realize until the conference was the extent of how unlikely a writer is to land an agent with absolutely no connections. The most valuable things I took away were:

1.) Being able to not only meet editors and agents face-to-face, but for them to really take a few minutes to listen and consider my novel. Now that I know how many queries agents receive each week, I can't even imagine how hard it is for them to fully consider each idea. Meeting them in person and getting one-on-one time with them is like gold.

2.) Meeting other talented writers and being able to form friendships and critique groups. I did not expect it to be such an atmosphere of camaraderie - it far surpassed my expectations.

3.) Getting feedback from industry professionals (and other writers) on what sounds like it clicks in any given story, and what does not. The editing is never done, but I came away with much larger ideas for my book than I would have considered on my own.

Overall an absolutely fantastic experience! I loved every minute of it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 08 Jan 2016, 16:27 
Offline

Joined: 06 Jan 2016, 14:20
Posts: 1
HeatherLeeigh wrote:
As someone who spent years going the typical query letter route, I found the Algonkian Pitch Conference to be a complete game changer for me. I already understood that it takes years to hone your craft and an exceptional amount of diligence if you actually want to make it in the world of publishing. What I did not realize until the conference was the extent of how unlikely a writer is to land an agent with absolutely no connections. The most valuable things I took away were:

1.) Being able to not only meet editors and agents face-to-face, I saw this about the 3 Week Diet and thought of you but for them to really take a few minutes to listen and consider my novel. Now that I know how many queries agents receive each week, I can't even imagine how hard it is for them to fully consider each idea. Meeting them in person and getting one-on-one time with them is like gold.

2.) Meeting other talented writers and being able to form friendships and critique groups. I did not expect it to be such an atmosphere of camaraderie - it far surpassed my expectations.

3.) Getting feedback from industry professionals (and other writers) on what sounds like it clicks in any given story, and what does not. The editing is never done, but I came away with much larger ideas for my book than I would have considered on my own.

Overall an absolutely fantastic experience! I loved every minute of it.


I totally agree with you Heather. It seems in all walks of life it's important to make connections and that's especially true in the publishing world.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 20 Dec 2016, 14:41 
Offline

Joined: 20 Dec 2016, 14:39
Posts: 1
mkbaker wrote:
The pitch conference ethos to help the author, specifically to help How do you take Phen375? market her/his wares, is everywhere evident. Facilitators, other authors, editors were all encouraging and helpful in practical, applied-side ways. Refreshingly different from dog-eat-dog, anxious, competitive environment that mars some other professional conferences I have experienced.


OK I think my minute's up. Thanks again, Michael, Susan and Paula.

Michele McKnight Baker




A better title. Susan listened to me, paused the conversation at “soldier’s heart” and said, “That’s a good title.” Of course! Thanks, Susan!
re-writing the pitch. Gollyosky I am still rewriting the blasted thing. Now I have the eyes to see how to do it.
Advice to not rush the submission process until the mss and pitch are ready. I know this is good advice. It will be so hard to follow. But I will try.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 3 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group