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PostPosted: 19 Sep 2016, 08:42 
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Joined: 17 Sep 2016, 16:44
Posts: 1
Story Statement

The narrator chases success as a nomadic street performer in Europe


Antagonist

The antagonist is the narrator’s partner, Tom, a talented guitar player who is charismatic and ambitious. Tom does not come from the same place of privilege as the narrator, and therefore feels like he can chastise her when she behaves in a dreaded 'middle class' way. He has helped make their performer act, 'East Cackalacky,' gain attention by putting on a cardboard robot hat to play, but even though it is one of the things that have made their lifestyle sustainable, he resents being boxed into what he sees as a joke act. He's so caught up in wrestling with his own demons, use of alcohol to calm his anxieties, constant fretting over his long-term poverty, that he ignores or sometimes denies the narrator's needs. She admires and strives to copy his boldness, but is torn down by statements that he makes like, “Why am I always poor,” or, “you’re bringing me down, you don’t have what it takes,” which cause her to feel that his inner demons are her burdens to solve.


Breakout Title

East Cackalacky Busks the World

Busked it! A rock and roll travel adventure

Crapbot and the Saw Lady


Two Comparables

George Orwell - Down and Out in Paris and London
Because the protagonist becomes poor to work on his craft, but ends up constantly thinking about money

Into the Wild (the movie more than the book)
Because it encapsulates the longing of a generation looking for freedom and a 'real' experience from life, even if that means running away and putting themselves in harms way


Conflict

Having abandoned her middle class lifestyle to travel with an alcoholic guitar player, the narrator struggles to survive and stay emotionally stable, despite diminishing resources and constant arguments with her partner.



Inner Conflict/Environmental Conflict

The narrator is desperate to prove that she is a ‘has what it takes,’ that she is gutsy enough to both survive on the street and appear stylishly bohemian while doing it. She is filled with anxiety and insecurity. Partly because she is unreasonable about how much of the 'road lifestyle' she can handle with grace. Partly because she feels that her partner thinks she is unworthy, not tough enough, too middle class, etc. The need for his validation conflicts with her belief that she is independent and capable of surviving on her own, causing her to lash out with arguments, or sometimes lash out sexually by engaging other men in threesomes because she sees that as her power over him.

Poverty is another conflict. Both characters are fighting their own idea of what 'being poor' means and how to overcome it, both have conflicting ideas on how to behave. Tom is certain that if they get better as musicians they will escape. The narrator spends time hustling, for example collecting bottles for the deposit money, hoping that will help the couple get ahead.

The other conflict is the outside world. One of the things that keeps these two characters together is their belief that it's them against the world. They spend time talking up their own skills, and insulting or complaining about people they know because those people 'just aren't good enough.'
Strangers are potential obstacles, to be treated friendly but with distrust. Other street musicians are competitions, the homeless cause guilt by association, and their friends who put them up are only stealing time away from the mission.


Setting

The book is set in Western Europe, with some flashbacks to America. It is a travel novel— the movement from city to city is essential for the narration and character development. The book progresses as the characters arrive in a new place. As they move, they face brand new challenges, weather is one of the biggest factors affecting their survival and mood. The gloom, cold and constantly drizzle of England beats down their resolve to work hard as musicians, the dry, desert bareness of Northern Spain leave them feeling desperate, the relaxed Summer weather of Germany allows them to drop their guard and spend days living out of parks. More of a prop than a setting, the backpacks and music equipment are like the characters movable 'home.' Their home is a burden. They must carry it at all times because otherwise all their possessions are lost.


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PostPosted: 19 Sep 2016, 19:32 
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Joined: 10 Sep 2016, 16:42
Posts: 1
ASSIGNMENT 1: Story Statement:

A gargoyle from the Underworld is unwillingly guided to save the world.

ASSIGNMENT 2: Antagonist:

There are three.

Haile: seeks to change what has been in order to expand freedom of those living in the cavern, and feels the only way to do so is to overthrow the Elder’s Council (of which he is a part), and establish ties with their long time enemy King Grack, who has no idea who he is or that he exists.
Polaaris: operating under unknown motives, Polaaris is the voluntary servant of King Grack. He travels to the Underworld with a mission to find and destroy members of a family that may have “Chosen” blood in them. For his own reasons, Polaaris chooses to put the family members through his own test to discover if one of them is The Chosen, and uses Haile to do so without him knowing. If they fail the test, they die.
Grack: King Grack is the ultimate antagonist of the story, the puppeteer and mastermind operating all of the moving pieces. His ultimate goal is to discover if any of the family members with chosen blood have survived who might fulfill the prophesy of Shadow to obtain the power to oppose him.

ASSIGNMENT 3: Breakout Title:

The Awakening of Eloa
He Who Draws The Circle
The Light From Below
The Shadows Open
The Opening in the Earth

ASSIGNMENT 4: Comparables and Genre:

Genre: Adult Fantasy

Alvin Maker Series (Orson Scott Card)
Mistborn Trilogy (Brandon Sanderson)
The Elf Queen of Shannara (Terry Brooks)
Taran Wanderer (Lloyd Alexander)

ASSIGNMENT 5: Conflict Line:

As unforeseen enemies combine against him, a military trainer loses everything and is forced to choose between risking death to find those responsible, or flee possibly never to return.

ASSIGNMENT 6: Inner and Secondary Conflict:

Inner Conflict:
Kaing feels conflicted because he left the Underworld, which may be the only place where he can recover his son, but he also has no faith in finding him even if he did stay.

He feels conflicted because he is grieving for the death of his wife, and loss of his son, and feels he deserves to grieve for a time, but he also is very duty driven, and immediately obeys the command of his grandfather to leave the Underworld for his own safety, making it impossible to have any time to grieve.

He is also conflicted because he feels he could do a lot of good searching for the evil members of the Vahtie in the Underworld, but he also knows that his particular abilities would better serve the Shendoa army in the coming war against King Grack.

Ultimately he is torn between having a desire to live at all, but continues forward in the hopes that he will be able to make a difference.

Secondary Conflict: Social Environment:
The conflict in the context of social environment mainly takes place between Kaing, his brother Ghon, and Kaing’s wife Kiara. Ghon relies on Kaing’s counsel often, which pulls him away from having time with Kiara. But as Kiara and Kaing both know that it is his job, even though they are both frustrated by how frequently Kaing is called upon to leave, they both tolerate it under a sense of duty, as if to honor a formal agreement they have made. Regardless, there is a subtle level of unspoken resentment that Kiara holds towards Ghon for stealing time with Kaing, and a little resentment from Ghon towards Kiara for not being willing to share Kaing more freely.

ASSIGNMENT 7: Setting:

This story takes place in an era when the Earth was new, in an abandoned underground city called the Underworld, once inhabited by a fairly advanced people called the Ancient Linns. Rediscovered in a time of great need, the Underworld serves as a sanctuary for those living in the outside world seeking to escape the reaches of a tyrannical king named Grack.

Large populations of humans, dwarves, and gargoyles who have fled to the Underworld form the nation of Shendoa, and using what the Linns have left behind, thrive in their hidden environment and though unseen, over three hundred years rise to become the only possible rival to the Dark King Grack. Motivated to regain all they have lost, the Shendoa culture is a military driven society based on duty and honor.

Just when the Shendoa army is finally prepared to attack the Dark King and take back their lands, rising political groups inside the Underworld threaten traditions that have been in place for centuries, which could discourage the preparation of the army, and place the safety of the entire nation in jeopardy.

Passage between worlds is strictly governed to keep the entrance to the Underworld safe. Characters from the Underworld travel to the outside world while outsiders infiltrate and enter from the outside. A portion of the story takes place in the outside world. The outside world directly surrounding the entrance to the Underworld is governed by King Grack, and everything near and far has been tamed by him, save for a few kingdoms to the south where he has not yet extended his reign.

Magic has a negative connotation by all as it infers coercion. There are shared religious beliefs and superstitions among all peoples regarding the Elements and their ability to voluntarily grant access to their abilities, which is not considered magic, and instead is referred to as being selected as a Speaker of nature, which is a person who is a representative of an Element, gifted free use of abilities inside of each Element. Speakers are very rare, and are referred to most as myths and legends.


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PostPosted: 19 Sep 2016, 20:24 
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Joined: 20 Aug 2016, 01:41
Posts: 1
Story Statement
To prevent mankind from following a path of devastation, one man must use his connection to the far future to overcome a powerful network of cronies and put civilization onto a path with seemingly infinite potential.

The Antagonist
Brendan is an exceptional software developer from our ‘when’, with a lifelong love for altering his perception of the world. Upon discovering his link to a girl living in the far future, Brendan learns that he is a finity, a rare being capable of linking with others across space and time. Now it is up to him to secure the path to her ‘when’. To succeed, Brendan must overcome his own arrogance and naivety to rise and become a leader and inspiration for all of humanity.

Breakout Title
The Channel (Book 1 of The Anthropic Series)
The Finity
Anthropic Heart

Genre and Comparables

Science Fiction, Utopian Dystopian Fiction, Young Adult Fiction

The Divergent Series — Veronica Roth
A girl coming of age in a dystopian future must find her inner strength to do what’s right for all of society.

The Commonwealth Saga — ‎Peter F. Hamilton
An imperfect utopian society must pull together to conqueror alien forces that defy human reason.

The Primary Conflict
After a brief glimpse of a fantastic future made possible by massive innovation, Brendan is forced into a battle with powerful government insiders to prevent a devastating future that is all too real.

Secondary Conflicts
Framed as a hacker, Brendan must decide to play by the rules or become an outlaw. Simultaneously, in a dystopian future, Brendan’s link must overcome the god-like Masters to warn him just how wrong things have gone.

Inner Conflict
Torn between two loves, Brendan must discover where his heart truly belongs.

Setting and Sub-setting
The story begins in the Boston area, flipping between a modern day ‘when’ and a surreal ‘when’ that is far into future. After Brendan’s world is turned upside down, he must flee to a secluded compound in the wilds of Montana. From there he builds, Genesis, an entirely sustainable, off-the-grid town with the innovations needed to save civilization.


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PostPosted: 20 Sep 2016, 11:08 
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Joined: 20 Sep 2016, 11:02
Posts: 2
Story Statement: Black River
Scott’s desire is to restablish a closer relationship with his estranged father (an agnostic) and with Jesus (God) by studying to be a priest. Then, things start falling apart when his father leaves and the dreaded possibility of DIVORCE causes him to question his understanding of his faith. Scott desires to learn and know everything, even the stuff his faith and parents would rather he didn't.

The antagonistic forces in Black River
Like his father, Scott is constantly faced with distractions and doubts, planted by his father and by circumstances of his own personality that contend with his adolescent Catholic concept of God and what God wants, in order for Scott to serve Him. He is the subject of frequent threats from predators:
neighborhood thugs, and the natural hazards of various rivers, their backwaters, and the wilderness of Wisconsin.

His twelve-year-old's wanderlust, bookishness and skill at equivocation take him further from his goal. Humorous mishaps and serious errors of judgement involving snakes, horses, mice, a new Winnebago friend, and the unexpected onset of puberty, cause him to feel responsible for, the death of his sister, the mental breakdown of his mother, and the dissolution of his family.

Like a Dickensian waif, he is sent to Chicago to live with his 96-year-old great Uncle Ode, whom he knows only by reputation. Traveling alone to Ode on The Zephyr, he has a chance encounter on a train, with a slightly older young lady, Willie, who is in similar situation and who changes the course of everything.

The Catholic church itself and his study of its history and methods further alienate him from his naive sense of right and wrong.

Willie has her own demons that set them on the road, into the wilderness together to find answers.

Fear of discovery by: police, Russian invaders (Cuban Missile Crisis) force them to learn to get by on their own until rescued and adopted by a Winnebago Shaman woman.

Break out Titles

Black River

Life on the Black River

Guardian Angels

Stealing Pears

Becoming Winnebago

Jesus, Love me

Two Comparables for Black River

Black River is a coming of age novel Like the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn set in 1962, as if written by a Catholic Woody Allen.

Black River is an apostrophe like the “Confessions” of St. Augustine. Scott is searching for God and wanting to be good enough to “Know Him,” “but, not just yet.

Or an adolescent perspective on "Portnoy's Complaint."


Conflict Lines for Black River
Scott’s ambition, established by his maternal grandmother and her sisters, is to become a Catholic Priest–respected and honored by society and his parish. However his natural instinct for adventure and an inate sense of right and wrong run afoul of that ambition.

OTHER MATTERS OF CONFLICT:
Scott is driven to learn all the right words that will make it possible for him to achieve the impossible. Like the latin he learned serving Mass that turns bread and wine into the body and blood of God. The vocabulary of lawyers and judges that bring freedom to condemned people. The words a priest uses that can save a person's soul. He discovers, however, words don’t always have the intended effect.

His Catholic upbringing has given him one rigid understanding of God and truth. Other people he cares about see truth and God from different perspectives. On his own in the wilderness with Willie, they are confronted with many moral questions.

Settings for Black River
It is the Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter of 1962-63. Nuclear annihilation is immanent, Kruschev is moving missiles into Cuba. The United States is sending military advisors to Vietnam, some of whom have started to come home in boxes. Gas is twenty-four cents a gallon. A Hershey Bar is a nickel. Chubby Checker has the number one hit on the radio. Ed Sullivan, Bonanza, and Perry Mason are three of the most-watched television programs.

La Crosse, Wisconsin, is where the Mississippi, The Black and the La Crosse Rivers meet. Their marshes, lagoons, backwaters, sand bars; their bluffs and escarpments, coulees, monadnoks surround a small city built at that confluence by lumber men, farmers merchants and religious outposts of several denominations. Scott is drawn to all them and has explored and studied them on his own and at the library, where he spends much of his time since he is the puniest, clumsiest kid in his class and not invited to, nor is he interested in team sports.

When his sister and her friend are lost to the rivers and not recovered, his family is dissolved, and he is sent to Chicago to live in the Majestic Hotel with a great Uncle he has only heard about because of his having defended many underworld figures from back in the twenties and thirties.

He is shown the cultural ropes of Chicago by a little older and more worldly girl he met on the train to Chicago. She (Willie) introduces him to popular music and dance via Dick Biondi and WLS radio.

He learns the Catholic aspect of the city from his father’s fiancé, whose Uncle is a Monsignor and principal of the school Scott will attend.

He learns about architecture, the underworld, Da Bears and Da Cubs from his godfather and uncle’s partner, Shadow. And then there’s the river, which in Chicago is nothing like the ones at home, gray-green, smelly and oily, hemmed in entirely by skyscrapers, and reputed to be, by Shadow, the repository of some of his uncle’s former clients and or their associates.

Urban renewal is changing The Loop and Scott’s Uncle is facilitating much of the change which includes the demolition of his own home.

Scott and Willie must flee the city to go looking for Scott’s Uncle who has retired to a former gang hideout close to the Winnebago Mission near Black River Falls, Wisconsin. However, when they get there, it is empty. They don’t know what has become of his uncle. And they fear the world might be blowing itself up (Cuban Missile crisis) but have no way of knowing because of the remoteness of the hideout and their desire not to be found by the authorities. The hideout is surrounded by bluffs accessible only by a railroad spur for which there is only one key. This location is surrounded by thousands of acres of the Black River State forest. Dangerous caves and hidden passageways near by complicate their situation. A Winnebago Shaman in one of the caves figures prominently in the end of the story.


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PostPosted: 20 Sep 2016, 18:20 
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Joined: 20 Sep 2016, 17:57
Posts: 1
Algonkin Pitch Conference
7 assignments
Mom is on the Roof: A Memoir
by C. Tatham Smith

First assignment
Statement:
A woman must learn to deal with the pain of an abusive childhood that caused her to lose her ability to speak.

Second assignment
Antagonist - Carol
Goals - To survive without being raped while living with a pedophile. To overcome the pain of being alienated by her family for not denying the neglect and abuse of her childhood. To learn to speak again or accept that she can’t. To find peace and aid in protecting other children from child abuse.
Background - A spoiled seemingly happy kid from conservative Orange County, California.
Ways she reacts to the world around her - She joins her family in denying and even ignoring their reality. She uses humor and snappy one liners as a replacement for genuine communication and escape.

Third assignment
Title:
Mom is on the Roof : A Memoir

Alternatives:
Reclaiming My Voice
If You Don’t Hear Me, Am I Talking To Myself?
He Left Me Speechless
Rose Colored Glasses
I Can Speak For The Children
I Can’t Speak For Myself
This Memoir is About You
A Diary and Frank
I Am In The Bedroom, But My Voice Is On The Roof
Hear My Silent Tale
Don’t Say a Word
Feathers
Beauty Bites
Queen of DeNial
I’ll Just Sit in the Dark
See No Evil
Vision Quest
A Memoir: A Trashy Tale Of Immediate Gratification
Silenced
Love Denied
I’m Hate To Have To Tell You This
The Day I Lost My Voice Forever
Cruel Silence
The Day I Lost The Voice I Never Had
Out of the Mouths of Babes
Out of the Mouths of Babes…Comes Silence
Reality TV in a Book
A Memoir: A Lascivious Tale of Self Gratification
Muted
Detrimental Delusion
If I Talk and Nobody Hears, Am I Still Speaking?
An Affair With Manipulation
An Affair With Silence
A Silent Affair
Listen Up
Speechless
Surrender To The Silence
Surrender
A Silent Quest
Hear My Silence
A Toast To The Voice I Never Had
I Drink For The Voice I Never Had
I Drink So You Can Hear Me
Bartender, Buy Friends For All My Drinks
You Can’t Hear Me
Listen Here Lung Yady
A Silent Tale
A Tiny Tale of Cruelty
Silent Story
He Left Me Speechless:
The Story of the Day I Lost My Voice Forever
Maybe I’ll Be Able To Speak When I Forget
Forget and Don’t Say A Word
I Toast the Voice I Never Had
Shut Up
Forget and Shut Up
Use It or Lose It
I Am Here To Not Speak For The Children
"Help" or "Listen" written in sign language
Momma’s Dirty Black Book
You Decide

Fourth Assignment
Running with Scissors, by Augusten Burroughs

My story and viewpoint are similar to Augusten Burroughs as we both use humor to deal with surviving a crazy mother and childhood.

Laughable comparison? Need a rising star of memoirs?

Fifth Assignment
Conflict Line
Primary Conflict:
Mom is on the Roof, by Carol Tatham Smith
A child, Carol, struggles to grow up safely in an abusive home. As an adult, Carol, tries to grapple with the denial surrounding their family’s truth.

Sixth Assignment
Inner conflict
Mentally tortured by a family that criticizes her for dealing with her issues over being molested throughout her childhood causing her to lose her ability to speak, a woman must decide if she can accept her family despite their treatment of her and stay with them or if she must let go and move on without them.

Secondary conflict
A girl desperately wants the love of her family but they must make her out to be a villain to escape the guilt they would otherwise feel if they had to face the truth about how they neglected their duty as human beings to protect her from harm.

Seventh Assignment
The story is set in sunny Southern California in homes which are progressively more opulent yet ordinary enough that no one would ever suspect the dysfunction that goes on behind their closed doors.


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PostPosted: 21 Sep 2016, 21:40 
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Joined: 20 Sep 2016, 11:02
Posts: 2
1. Story Statement: Black River

Scott’s desire is to restablish a closer relationship with his father (An agnostic) and with Jesus (God) by studying to be a priest.

2. Two Comparables for Black River

Black River is a coming of age novel Like the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn set in 1962, writen by a Catholic Woody Allen.

Black River is an apostrophe like the “Confessions” of St. Augustine. Scott searching for God and wanting to be good enough to “Know Him,” “but, not just yet.


3. Conflict Lines for Black River


Scott’s ambition, established by his maternal grandmother and her sisters, is to become a Catholic Priest–respected and honored by society and his parish. However his natural instinct for adventure and an inate sense of right and wrong run afoul of that ambition.


4. Break out Titles

Black River

Life on the Black River

Black River Adventures

Stealing Pears

Becoming Winnebago

Jesus Love me


5. OTHER MATTERS OF CONFLICT:

Scott is driven to learn all the right words that will make it possible for him to achieve the impossible. Like the latin he learned serving Mass that turns bread and wine into the body and blood of God. The vocabulary of lawyers and judges that bring freedom to condemned people. The words a priest uses that can save a person’s soul. He discovers, however, words don’t always have the intended effect, equivocations and misunderstandings and different points of view can create serious unintended consequences.

His Catholic upbringing has given him one rigid understanding of God and truth. Other people he cares about see truth and God from different perspectives that contradict and or bring into question those truths. On his own in the wilderness with Willie they are confronted with ethical and moral questions not addressed in the simple dogma of the church.


6. Settings for Black River

It is the Spring, Summer, Fall and winter of 1962-63. Nuclear annihilation is immanent, Kruschev is moving missiles into Cuba. The United States is sending military advisors to Vietnam, some of whom have started to come home in boxes. Gas is twenty-four cents a gallon. A Hershey Bar is a nickel. Chubby Checker has the number one hit on the radio. Ed Sullivan, Bonanza, and Perry Mason are three of the most watched television programs.

Lacrosse, Wisconsin is where the Mississippi, The Black and the LaCrosse Rivers meet. Their, marshes, lagoons backwaters, sand bars; their bluffs and escarpments, coulees, monadnoks surrounding a small city built at that confluence by lumber men, farmers merchants and religious outposts of several denominations. Scott is drawn to all them and has explored and studied them on his own at the library where he spends much of his time since he is the puniest clumsiest kid in his class and not invited to nor is he interested in team sports.

When his sister and her friend are lost to the rivers and not recovered, his family is dissolved, and he is sent to Chicago to live in the Majestic Hotel with a great Uncle he has only heard about because of his having defended many underworld figures from back in the twenties and thirties.

He is shown the cultural ropes of Chicago by a little older and more worldly girl he met on the train to Chicago. She (Willie) introduces him to popular music and dance via Dick Biondi and WLS radio.

He learns the Catholic aspect of the city from his father’s fiancé whose Uncle is a Monsignor and principal of the school Scott will attend.

He learns about architecture, the underworld Da Bears and Da Cubs from his godfather and uncle’s partner, Shadow. And then there’s the river, which in Chicago is nothing like the ones at home, gray-green, smelly and oily, hemmed in entirely by skyscrapers, and reputed to be, by Shadow, the repository of some of his uncle’s former clients and or their associates.

Urban renewal is changing The Loop and Scott’s Uncle is facilitating much of the change which includes the demolition of his own home.

Scott and Willie must flee the city to go looking for Scott’s Uncle who has retired to a former gang hideout near the Winnebago Mission near Black River Falls, Wisconsin. However, when they get there it is empty. They don’t know what has become of his uncle, nor the rest of the world because of the remoteness of the hideout and their desire not to be found by the authorities. the hideout is surrounded by bluffs accessible only by a railroad spur for which there is only one key. This location is surrounded by thousands of acres of the Black river State forest. From the hideout there is an passageway to a cavern where lives a Winnebago medicine woman who figures prominently in the end of the story.


7. The antagonistic force in Black River

Like his father, Scott is constantly faced with distractions and doubts,planted by his father and by circumstances of his own personality that contend with his adolescent Catholic concept of God and what God wants in order for him to serve Him.

His wanderlust and skill at equivocation take him further from his goal, causing events that make him feel responsible for the death of his sister, the mental breakdown of his mother, and the dissolution of his family. His situation is further complicated unprepared onset of puberty and the introduction of a young lady, Willie, who is in similar situation, familywise, but with a distinctly non-religius persective. The Catholic church itself and his study of it’s history and methods further alienate him from his naive sense of right and wrong. Willie has her own demons (Insestuous step-father, absent father and distracted mother) that set them on the road together to find answers.


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PostPosted: 22 Sep 2016, 04:24 
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Joined: 21 Sep 2016, 19:22
Posts: 1
Act of Story Statement

Seventh-grader Austin B. Comfort must help his fellow students learn French, get good grades, master apostrophes, and get new cell phones, all the while keeping his friends from being trapped into tutoring sessions with his mom and organizing the best Whipped Cream Pie Toss booth in the history of forever to earn enough money to get faster internet for the town library and save his dad’s job.

The Antagonist Plots the Point

What could be more boring that living in a small town? Living in a small town in with the highest unemployment rate in the country. In a state whose claim to fame, now that Detroit is dead, is that it’s shaped like a mitten! Boredom is a seventh-grader’s greatest enemy: boring school, boring bus rides, boring summer chores. But everything is more boring when the town closes the pool due to lack of funds, the skateboard park floods after the levee fails, and the school principal volunteers the entire middle school to do the Parks & Rec maintenance after the phys ed program is cut to make room for tutoring so the school can hit its mandated goal for the Michigan Educational Standards test. The real antagonist here is the shattered economy of the Midwest. But the economy is aided and abetted by every adult.

Breakout Title

The Most Boring Life of Austin B. Comfort

Comparables:

Gordon Korman’s Swindle meets Donna Gephart’s Death by Toilet Paper.

The Most Boring Life of Austin B. Comfort is comparable to Gordon Korman’s Swindle inasmuch as the protagonist always has a plan. If your life is boring, he can pep it up for you, for ten dollars, cash. And his friends may be reluctant to go along with the plan, but they always see the light in the end. Donna Gephart’s Death by Toilet Paper is also comparable, because the protagonist in both books sees his parent(s) struggle with serious financial problems, and he comes up with a plan that (I know it sounds crazy) just may help!

Primary Conflict

Struggling against the never-ending boredom of life in the dullest, poorest town in the history of ever, seventh-grader Austin B. Comfort enacts a plan to bring the lead singer of a Boy Band to his small-town’s Pie Toss to earn enough money to bring faster internet to the town library and save his dad’s job, and the town’s economy, while he’s at it.


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PostPosted: 11 Aug 2017, 17:53 
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A last update: showcasing and deals are not the same. I jump at the chance to say that advertising is in regards to individuals and deals is about dollars. Advertising happens over a more extended term is firmly fixing to building connections. Dissertation Help


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