Re: May 2, 2019 Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) 21st annual poetry issue:

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Michael (MV)
Posts: 1516
Joined: 18 Apr 2005, 04:57

Re: May 2, 2019 Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) 21st annual poetry issue:

#1 Post by Michael (MV) » 01 May 2019, 16:32

http://poetrysuperhighway.com/psh/

It is an honor and a healthy sense of community involvement - via my creative writing - to be a contributor in poetry (#31)
to this global anthology, and to share the publication with other creatives, like here @ WB.

in the spirit creativity,

Michael (MV)

http://poetrysuperhighway.com/psh/2019/ ... ssue/#fp31

FranktheFrank
Posts: 1489
Joined: 02 Mar 2016, 18:07
Location: Between the mountains and the sea

Re: May 2, 2019 Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) 21st annual poetry issue:

#2 Post by FranktheFrank » 01 May 2019, 17:56

Congratulations Michael
it is well that we remember the evil done
to a peculiar people in the name of National Socialism.

Kenneth2816
Posts: 961
Joined: 01 Jun 2008, 09:17

Re: May 2, 2019 Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) 21st annual poetry issue:

#3 Post by Kenneth2816 » 01 May 2019, 20:22

Nice. The Highway was I think, the first venue for me.

The genocide in Germany wasn't done in the name of Socialism of any kind, but the demented racial purity politics of one man.

Marx was a Jew. The Nazis hated socialism and communism

FranktheFrank
Posts: 1489
Joined: 02 Mar 2016, 18:07
Location: Between the mountains and the sea

Re: May 2, 2019 Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) 21st annual poetry issue:

#4 Post by FranktheFrank » 02 May 2019, 09:56

I would like to share this in keeping with this thread:

Do not stand at my grave and weep
by Mary Elizabeth Frye

Do not stand at my grave and weep:
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning’s hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circling flight.
I am the soft starshine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry:
I am not there; I did not die.

This consoling elegy had a very mysterious genesis, as it was written by a Baltimore housewife who lacked a formal education, having been orphaned at age three. Mary Elizabeth Frye had never written poetry before. She wrote the poem on a ripped-off piece of a brown grocery bag, in a burst of compassion for a Jewish girl who had fled the Holocaust only to receive news that her mother had died in Germany. The girl was weeping inconsolably because she couldn't visit her mother's grave, to share her tears of love and bereavement. When the poem was named Britain's most popular poem in a 1996 Bookworm poll, with more than 30,000 call-in votes despite not having been one of the critics' nominations, an unlettered orphan girl had seemingly surpassed all England's many cultured and degreed ivory towerists in the public's estimation. Although the poem's origin was disputed for some time (it had been attributed to Native American and other sources), Frye's authorship was confirmed in 1998 after investigative research by Abigail Van Buren, the newspaper columnist better known as "Dear Abby." The poem has also been called "I Am" due to its rather biblical repetitions of the phrase. Frye never formally published or copyrighted the poem, so we believe it is in the public domain and can be shared, although we recommend that it not be used for commercial purposes, since Frye never tried to profit from it herself.

Facts about the Poem and Mary Elizabeth Frye
compiled by Michael R. Burch

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