Algonkian Novel Writing Courses - Reviews and Interviews

Reviews and interviews with Algonkian writers in the novel writing courses.
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WritersBlock
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Algonkian Novel Writing Courses - Reviews and Interviews

#1 Post by WritersBlock » 08 Sep 2013, 02:12

Links to commercial contracts and agent signings related to Algonkian conferences, the New York Pitch, and Algonkian Author Salon can be found at http://novelwriting.algonkianconference ... rviews.htm

Interviews with aspiring authors in the Algonkian novel writing courses and program:
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Through the work involved in ACT ZERO, I've become a believer in backstory. The going has been challenging--at first, I worried that I didn't have time to write anecdotes that may or may not come into the book. But then the effort paid in spades when I saw a significant opportunity (through one of those anecdotes) to deepen the inner conflict of the main character and allow for a link to the antagonist that I would never have imagined without this intense groundwork.

The Sympathetic Character Factors in the Hook, forced me to more closely examine my protagonist. She was/is a sympathetic character to me, but the assignment requires that I articulate and then give evidence that reflects sympathetic character traits. Again, that work resulted in a richer grab; this facet of the program has helped me create stronger main and supporting characters.

- Janet Zupan - Algonkian Novel Writing Courses - Review


Learning and practicing the four levels of third person narrative POV had the biggest impact on my writing. The zoom lens effect of author POV/distant/close/first-close gives the narrative more depth and energy, allowing the reader to not only see what a character sees, but to get right inside their head and hear their inner thoughts--perhaps the ultimate show-don't-tell technique.

- Lois Gordon - Algonkian Novel Writing Courses Review


I had not expected that strengthening the depth of my characters' lives both past and present would so naturally work to form plot. Module 6-8 (6-Act) then created a visual image of my novel as a whole that helped me ensure I had the necessary elements for a publishable novel. I was also surprised how helpful Module 2 (Antagonist) was in developing strong plot line. By fleshing out an antagonist, and an in-depth backstory, the overall plot was transformed.

- Brittany Hughes - Algonkian Novel Writing Courses Review


The courses direct focus on specifics in each character's backstory, a technique that helped make the characters become more vivid, taking substantive form in my mind's eye. As a result, as I lay relaxing in a hot bath or driving to get groceries, scenes would pop into my mind which, while dictated by the constraints of story, were fully driven by character.

- Walter Thompson - Algonkian Novel Writing Courses Review


Sincerely, every module was very helpful. I could write a case for each one. Detailing the climax gave me a window in to how to seed foreshadowing throughout the novel. I love the way subtle foreshadowing is a gift for astute readers--I want to give that gift. Too often foreshadowing is heavy-handed or non-existent. If I didn't know exactly where I was headed (climax) then I wouldn't have the intimacy with the overall plotline necessary to plant these little gems.

- Sela Gaglia - Algonkian Novel Writing Courses Review


The Algonkian program has forced me to more carefully consider the vital details of the novel writing process as a whole. The emphasis on backstory and the development of theme, scene creation in the context of the six act plot structure, and of course, the module on the antagonist. The course has also helped me to be more aware of marketability.

- John Loving - Algonkian Novel Writing Courses Review


Algonkian's novel writing course modules have strengthened my novel. The most surprising was the section concerning the antagonist. I realized the character I'd identified as the antagonist was insufficiently dimensional. He was mostly off-stage, and questions pertaining to his actions and motivation revealed his lack of importance. I could have created content, but strangely enough, he was not a pivotal point. After second and third thoughts, I identified the true villain. Once I worked through the assignment, she became a fascinating creature intimately related to the theme.

Another assignment was to describe the history of a setting. I chose the novel's Texas ranch, which had been merely a literary device. After researching and considering this locale, I found it to have a rich component that added depth to the story. The discovery was thrilling.

- Chance Maree - Algonkian Novel Writing Courses Review

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Arilaradylan
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Re: Author Salon Novel Writing Program - Reviews and Intervi

#2 Post by Arilaradylan » 13 Jan 2015, 21:51

My novel has an agent now, a good one from Writer's House, as a result of this Algonkian novel writing program.

What else do I need to say?
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RLmacallister
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Re: Algonkian Novel Writing Courses - Reviews and Interviews

#3 Post by RLmacallister » 15 Jan 2016, 23:41

Hail, hail the gang's all here... or will be shortly!

:wink:

I was dislodged from the novel writing program for some time due to life issues, but thankfully rejoined a few weeks ago and now I'm reviewing my first four course modules of Part I. I've come up with new antagonist features that in turn affect the plot line and therefore the synopsis and hook.

Ahhh, the delightful and inescapable beauty of it all!

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Leekaplan
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Algonkian Novel Writing Program

#4 Post by Leekaplan » 22 Jan 2016, 08:21

Hey, RlL! You okay?

I'm almost through Part II. It's a grinder but it's worth it. I just wish I'd discovered this before I blew my inheritance on a near useless MFA from U.A.

btw, Michael told me that Algonkian is making more inroads with TV producers. Did you hear anything about that?

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Re: Algonkian Novel Writing Courses - Reviews and Interviews

#5 Post by ASuserChar » 24 Jan 2016, 03:29

Ever since he made the MAGICIANS IMPOSSIBLE deal with Macmillan Books and Fox Studios he's been scouting the Algonkian writing program for stories to pitch for TV and film. I think he has at least a dozen novels that will be pitched to producers and creative execs... types of shakers like that.

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Leekaplan
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Re: Algonkian Novel Writing Courses - Reviews and Interviews

#6 Post by Leekaplan » 24 Jan 2016, 03:44

Char, you've been in the novel writing program and you were recently signed by ICM, right? What about your novel?

It could be a candidate for television!

btw, congrats on making it to the other side.

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Re: Algonkian Novel Writing Courses - Reviews and Interviews

#7 Post by ASuserChar » 24 Jan 2016, 04:12

Yes, it is a candidate for television.

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RLmacallister
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Re: Algonkian Novel Writing Program

#8 Post by RLmacallister » 25 Jan 2016, 00:03

Leekaplan wrote:Hey, RlL! You okay?

I'm almost through Part II. It's a grinder but it's worth it. I just wish I'd discovered this before I blew my inheritance on a near useless MFA from U.A.

btw, Michael told me that Algonkian is making more inroads with TV producers. Did you hear anything about that?
Yes Lee, I am fine. Thank you for your concern.

I agree the courses in the program are a grinder, as you say, but for me that's because I'm learning what I didn't know about writing a novel, therefore it forces rewrites and reconsideration. I haven't heard about the TV sales potential, but apparently, others have.

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MarleneNolan
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Re: Algonkian Novel Writing Program - Course Review

#9 Post by MarleneNolan » 02 Feb 2016, 00:39

I hate to sound catty, but a lot of writers who stay with the program and listen to faculty have contracts (like Wendy Eckel and Kate Cox, etc.), but others like the so-called "Write On Wenches" or whatever they call themselves, who drop out and slide into self-publication are actually out there "advising" other writers on how to get published! It's so ridiculous. It's like those dumb writer forums filled with blah blah trolls telling each other how to write and no one is published or ever worked in publishing.

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RobertKing
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Re: Algonkian Novel Writing Courses - Reviews and Interviews

#10 Post by RobertKing » 06 Feb 2016, 22:32

I tried one of those forums but they ran me out. I'm a tech fuddy duddy anyway.

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Alicia9kitty
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Re: Algonkian Novel Writing Courses - Reviews and Interviews

#11 Post by Alicia9kitty » 11 Feb 2016, 00:54

Hi everybody. I was enrolled in the Stanford program for a huge amount of money, just less than ten thousand, and as someone pointed out to me before I joined that program, I learned not to entirely trust advice I was receiving from fellow students and a faculty academic advisor who didn't understand my genre which is cozy mystery.

After I joined the Algonkian novel writing courses I was floundering for a week because I wasn't used to not having my hand held every moment, but the materials and readings, the assignments, are all extremely helpful. I've learned more in one month through four course modules then I learned in the entire Stanford program.

Michael Neff of the faculty has already written me to dispel some of the silly things I was told to do in the Stanford program. I much look forward to working with him further.

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